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Designing for behavioral and mental health using patient safety risk assessment

Designing for behavioral and mental health using patient safety risk assessment preview

Behavioral and mental health (BMH) includes many conditions and a multitude of centers for treatment. The level of concern for the safety of patients and staff due to the design of the built environment is not the same in all parts of a behavioral health facility.

When designing a facility, best practice is to use a patient safety risk assessment (PSRA) matrix. This tool relates an opportunity for a patient to be alone to a level of risk of self-harm.

A combination of these factors help to determine the level of risk involved with each room in the facility.
 
PSRA chart
Credit: Hunt/Sine

The PSRA is a simple tool that helps to breakdown the different levels of care in BMH facilities.  The chart is created by measuring a patient’s intent for self-harm in relation to the room’s level of observation. 

The level of concern for the safety of patients and staff due to the design of the built environment is not the same in all parts of a behavioral health facility.

These are more easily defined between low-risk and high-risk zones, and many facilities further divide them by levels.

Level 1: Areas where patients are never allowed or are under constant supervision like staff and service areas.

Level 2: Areas where patients are highly supervised such as corridors, counselling rooms, cafeterias, and activity rooms.

Level 3: Areas where patients spend time with minimal supervision such as lounges or day rooms.

Level 4: Areas where patients spend a great deal of time alone, such as showers, toilets, patient rooms and seclusions rooms.

Level 5:  Areas that require special consideration where staff interacts with newly admitted patients that present potential unknown risks or where patients may be in a highly agitated condition. Due to the unknowns, these areas fall outside of the risk map and require special considerations for patient safety. Such areas include high risk intake, seclusion rooms, examination rooms and admission rooms. 

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Posted: 1/5/2021 3:51:18 PM by Jesse Wade | with 0 comments